Skip to Content

Health Benefits of Beeswax Candles & How to Make DIY Candle Bowls

This post sharing the Health Benefits of Beeswax Candles may contain affiliate links which means, I will receive a small portion of any sales made at no extra cost to you.

I have always loved to burn candles and in the past have used paraffin candles until I learned the potential dangers of burning these types of candles in my home. Now that I know the harm that can come from burning paraffin candles, I use pure beeswax candles and soy candles most often. 

There is a lot of information out there that touches on the health benefits of burning beeswax instead of paraffin candles. After making the switch myself, I have decided to share what I found to be the most exciting reasons to make the switch. 

 Health Benefits of Beeswax Candles

Environmental & Health Benefits of Natural Beeswax Candles

Beeswax candles are all-natural and a safe alternative to candles that contain toxic byproducts. When beeswax candles burn, they emit negative ions rather than positive ions that traditional candles omit.

Most of us have used candles that omit black sludge because that has always been a common household product that we never really associated with health issues. Even the oldest candles from ancient times were made of animal fat but this was eventually phased out in favor of beeswax. 

Beeswax candles are environmentally friendly, safe, and non-toxic. If you aren’t sold on the idea of switching to a natural product just for the environmental benefits of beeswax candles, maybe your own health will be the reason for you to switch. 

Health Benefits of Beeswax Candles for Asthma Sufferers 

One of the most revered health benefits of beeswax candles is not having to worry about asthma symptoms being exasperated by traditional candle ingredients. Synthetic fragrances in a traditional burning candle can cause sinus problems. It is best to avoid synthetic smells for allergy sufferers and those with delicate lungs. Be sure to read up on the type of candle you burn, use only candles that do not use artificial fragrance. 

Beeswax Candles & Your Mood

Beeswax candles emit light similar to sunlight and this is the perfect light source that will not contribute to indoor air pollution. When burning beeswax during the Winter months you may notice a significant improvement in mood that is comparable to the impact of natural sunlight.

You can credit the high melting point that beeswax burns at for this bright light. 

Where to Get Beeswax Candles 

If you are not lucky enough to have a local beekeeper to buy beeswax and pounds of honey from, you can pick up your supplies online. Items like beeswax and soy wax are readily available online to make your own. 

If you are not very crafty or keen on the idea of making your own candles, you can pick them up online as well. Some are natural air purifiers or used for the purposes of aromatherapy. Some soy candles are great for restful sleep and stress relief. You can see how I made my own Soy Candles here. 

If you are hoping to buy beeswax candles that will give you more for your buck, these boast a long burn time and cotton wicks. 

If you want to just dip your toes into the benefits of Beeswax, you may enjoy this DIY Beeswax Candle Bowl Tutorial. 

Health Benefits of Beeswax Candles with DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls

One beeswax tea light can transform this delicate beeswax candle bowl votive into a warm, luminous lamp. Reap the health benefits of beeswax candles without spending a fortune, just learn how to make your own. 

Impress your family and friends with this easy-to-make gift using nothing more than a wax-covered water balloon and dried flowers.

DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls

Supplies Needed to Make Beeswax Candle Bowls

safety note
To avoid dropping the balloon and splashing hot wax, children may need help holding the balloon while dipping.

How to Make Beeswax Candle Bowls

Directions

  1. Set up a workstation with newsprint or cardboard to protect your work surface. Plug in the hot plate and put it on your work surface.
  2. Place the double boiler on the hot plate and melt the wax. You will need about 6″ (15 cm) of molten beeswax. Leave plenty of space between the top of the wax and the top of the container for wax displacement.                                     
  3. Make a water balloon to dip in the wax by stretching the mouth of the balloon over a faucet. Slowly run the water while firmly supporting the bottom of the balloon as it expands. Tightly squeeze the mouth of the balloon while removing it from the faucet. Tie a knot at the top of the balloon. Dry the water balloon completely with a paper towel.                                                                                                                                                                                        DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls Craft
  4. Using a smooth, fluid movement, dip the water balloon in and out of the wax slightly past the halfway point of the water balloon. Do not stop in the middle of the dipping movement or it will result in a visible seam. Wait a few seconds and then dip the water balloon into the wax again to the same depth. Repeat approximately 20 times to create a durable thickness of wax. The hotter the wax, the thinner each coat will be, so additional dips may be needed.
  5. Cradle the wax-coated water balloon in your lap or on a towel. Use a glue stick to attach the dried flowers and leaves onto the wax.                                                                                                                                                                       DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls Craft
  6. Dip the water balloon into the hot wax one last time to coat and seal the flowers. Set the water balloon upright to cool for a few minutes.
  7. Carefully puncture the water balloon over a sink using a small paring knife. The punctured water balloon will pull away from the wax sides, creating the candle bowl.
  8. Turn the griddle to the very lowest setting possible. Cover the griddle or warming tray with aluminum foil and secure with tape. Smooth the rim of the candle bowl by placing the rim on the griddle. Turn the bowl right side up. Place it on the griddle, make sure it is level, rest your palm on the rim, and gently press down for a few seconds to make a flat base surface. Be careful not to completely melt the bottom.                                                       DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls Craft
  9. Allow the melted wax to cool. Once cooled, using a ladle, carefully spoon a little melted wax into the candle bowl to strengthen the base. DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls Craft
  10. Put sand in the bowl to insulate the bottom from the heat of a tea light.

DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls Craft

 

Take it further

  • Pressing flowers is great fun in itself. To allow for adequate reseeding, only pick flowers where there are at least ten plants present. Pick less than a third of the flowers in any one area. Make a simple plant press using recycled paper sandwiched between corrugated cardboard and held together with rubber bands.
  • Not all flowers and leaves maintain their colors when pressed. Pansies, verbena, and larkspur maintain their colors well. Ferns, fennel, and dill add a beautiful feathery look.
  • Challenge yourself by only using flowers that are nectar and pollen producers for honeybees.

DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls Craft

This craft is from the book Beekeeper’s Lab 52 Family-Friendly Activities and Experiments Exploring the Life of the Hive by Kim Lehman you can pick up a copy of Beekeepers’ Lab here. 

Don’t forget to sign up for the free newsletter and follow along on social media so that you never miss a post again. 

If you are looking for more fun DIY Projects, try some of these below.

Trash to Treasure DIY Tray

No Sew DIY Ottoman Makeover

DIY No Sew Farmhouse Style Curtains

The Health Benefits of Beeswax Candles

How to Make DIY Beeswax Candle Bowls

Materials

  • newsprint or cardboard to protect work surface
  • beeswax
  • water balloons
  • aluminum foil
  • paper towels
  • glue stick
  • pressed flowers
  • tape
  • sand
  • tea light

Tools

  • electric hot plate
  • double boiler (the top part must be at least 7" [17.8 cm] in diameter)
  • paring knife
  • griddle or warming tray
  • ladle

Instructions

Set up a workstation with newsprint or cardboard to protect your work surface. Plug in the hot plate and put it on your work surface.

Place the double boiler on the hot plate and melt the wax. You will need about 6" (15 cm) of molten beeswax. Leave plenty of space between the top of the wax and the top of the container for wax displacement.                                     

Make a water balloon to dip in the wax by stretching the mouth of the balloon over a faucet. Slowly run the water while firmly supporting the bottom of the balloon as it expands. Tightly squeeze the mouth of the balloon while removing it from the faucet. Tie a knot at the top of the balloon. Dry the water balloon completely with a paper towel.                                                                                                                                                                                        

Using a smooth, fluid movement, dip the water balloon in and out of the wax slightly past the halfway point of the water balloon. Do not stop in the middle of the dipping movement or it will result in a visible seam. Wait a few seconds and then dip the water balloon into the wax again to the same depth. Repeat approximately 20 times to create a durable thickness of wax. The hotter the wax, the thinner each coat will be, so additional dips may be needed.

Cradle the wax-coated water balloon in your lap or on a towel. Use a glue stick to attach the dried flowers and leaves onto the wax.                                                                                                                                                                       

Dip the water balloon into the hot wax one last time to coat and seal the flowers. Set the water balloon upright to cool for a few minutes.

Carefully puncture the water balloon over a sink using a small paring knife. The punctured water balloon will pull away from the wax sides, creating the candle bowl.

Turn the griddle to the very lowest setting possible. Cover the griddle or warming tray with aluminum foil and secure with tape. Smooth the rim of the candle bowl by placing the rim on the griddle. Turn the bowl right side up. Place it on the griddle, make sure it is level, rest your palm on the rim, and gently press down for a few seconds to make a flat base surface. Be careful not to completely melt the bottom.                                                       

Allow the melted wax to cool. Once cooled, using a ladle, carefully spoon a little melted wax into the candle bowl to strengthen the base. 

Put sand in the bowl to insulate the bottom from the heat of a tea light.

Interested in Learning about Health Benefits in Other Products?

Learn about the health benefits of using DIY Cleaning Products, Health Benefits of Coconuts, Health Benefits of Bananas, or The Benefits of Fermented Vegan Protein by clicking the hyperlinked titles. 

 

Marysa

Wednesday 13th of October 2021

I would love to try making these some time. Some for myself and others for gifts!

Monica Simpson

Wednesday 13th of October 2021

That's interesting that traditional candles can be harmful to people suffering with asthma.

Sol

Wednesday 13th of October 2021

This DIY beeswax candle bowls are cool ideas and will surely fit in any living room.

Richelle Escat

Wednesday 13th of October 2021

I didn't know that it's beneficial for those who have asthma. Thanks for the knowledge!

Terri Steffes

Tuesday 12th of October 2021

Thi is right up my alley. I love reading posts like this one!

Skip to Instructions